Search results for "metrics"

How to report metrics to C-level executives

One common mistake when passing information to C-level executives is overwhelming them with details that they don’t understand or that they just don’t care. The lack of alignment on what to send them may give you a hard time when adopting new techniques, such as process metrics analysis. In this blog post, I’ll explain how … »

12 Common mistakes when using Process Metrics

We’ve been advocating in favor of using metrics for a while now, and we have built a lot of content about them. However, we have seen teams that are actively using metrics and not having the desired results. Here I compile the most common mistakes that teams are committing when using metrics, so you’ll know … »

The pros and cons of using daily metrics

As you may have noticed, we took advantage of the new Elixir Radar channel development to run some project management experiments, so we could improve our methods and toolset. Some of those can be found in these blog posts: Forecasting software project’s completion date through Monte Carlo Simulation Lead Time Experiment: Calculating Lead Time of … »

Why we love metrics? Cumulative flow diagrams

One of the big questions that an Agile Coach may face during his career is: How can I help the team to continuously improve the software development process? In this blog posts series, I have been sharing some of Plataformatec best practices that are helping us deliver better projects through a set of metrics and … »

Why we love metrics? Throughput and Burnup charts

Since I started working on software development, I have been dealing with two important, but not always convergent aspects: product scope and delivery flow. The process of aligning the expectations of product increment and team throughput is usually arduous, but when this happens, it improves the chances of project success. I will present here how … »

Why we love metrics? Learning with Lead time

Every time I think about indicators and metrics I remember a phrase from H. James Harrington that says: “Measurement is the first step that leads to control and eventually to improvement. If you can’t measure something, you can’t understand it. If you can’t get it, you can’t control it. If you can’t control it, you … »