Posts tagged "devise"

It has been reported that malicious users can do e-mail enumeration on sign in via timing attacks despite paranoid mode being enabled.

Whenever you try to reset your password or confirm your account, Devise gives you precise information on how to proceed, if the e-mail given is valid, if the token has not expired and so on. This means that, by trying any given e-mail, a third-party person can know if a particular e-mail is registered in that website or not.

While this is not a problem for many applications, some applications would like to keep their user information completely private, even if it means loss of usability on features like account confirmation. For such use cases, Devise supports something called paranoid mode, which has been reported to still be vulnerable to enumeration on sign in.

Releases

Only applications using Devise paranoid mode need to update. New releases have been made for Devise branches 3.2 (3.2.1), 3.1 (3.1.2), 3.0 (3.0.4) and 2.2 (2.2.8).

Users running on those branches and cannot upgrade immediately can fix this issue by applying this patch. Users running on older versions are recommended to upgrade to a supported branch immediately.

Acknowledgements

We want to thank Tim Goddard, from YouDo Ltd for reporting the issue and working with us on a fix.

We are glad to announce that Devise 3.1.0.rc is out. On this version, we have focused on some security enhancements regarding our defaults and the deprecation of TokenAuthenticatable. This blog post explains the rationale behind those changes and how to upgrade.

Devise 3.1.0.rc runs on both Rails 3.2 and Rails 4.0. There is a TL;DR for upgrading at the end of this post.

Note: We have yanked 3.1.0.rc and released to 3.1.0.rc2 which fixes some regressions. Thanks everyone for trying out the release candidates!

Do not sign the user in after confirmation

In previous Devise versions, the user was automatically signed in after confirmation. This meant that anyone that could access the confirmation e-mail could sign into someone’s account by simply clicking the link.

Automatically signing the user in could also be harmful in the e-mail reconfirmation workflow. Imagine that a user decides to change his e-mail address and, while doing so, he makes a typo on the new e-mail address. An e-mail will be sent to another address which, with the token in hands, would be able to sign in into that account.

If the user corrects the e-mail straight away, no harm will be done. But if not, someone else could sign into that account and the user would not know that it happened.

For this reason, Devise 3.1 no longer signs the user automatically in after confirmation. You can temporarily bring the old behavior back after upgrading by setting the following in your config/initializers/devise.rb:

config.allow_insecure_sign_in_after_confirmation = true

This option will be available only temporarily to aid migration.

Thanks to Andri Möll for reporting this issue.

Do not confirm account after password reset

In previous Devise versions, resetting the password automatically confirmed user accounts. This worked fine in previous Devise versions which confirmed the e-mail just on sign up, so the e-mail both confirmation and password reset tokens would be sent to were guaranteed to be the same. With the addition of reconfirmable, this setup change and Devise will no longer confirm the account after password reset.

Thanks to Andri Möll for reporting this issue and working with us on a fix.

CSRF on sign in

Devise’s sign in page was vulnerable to CSRF attacks when used with the rememberable feature. Note that the CSRF vulnerability is restricted only to the sign in page, allowing an attacker to sign the user in an account controlled by the attacker. This vulnerability does not allow the attacker to access or change a user account in any way.

This issue is fixed on Devise 3.1.0 as well as 3.0.2 and 2.2.6. Users on previous Devise versions can patch their application by simply defining the following in their ApplicationController:

def handle_unverified_request
  super
  Devise.mappings.each_key do |key|
    cookies.delete "remember_#{key}_token"
  end
end

Thanks to Kevin Dew for reporting this issue and working with us on a fix.

Store digested tokens in the database

In previous versions, Devise stored the tokens for confirmation, reset password and unlock directly in the database. This meant that somebody with read access to the database could use such tokens to sign in as someone else by, for example, resetting their password.

In Devise 3.1, we store an encrypted token in the database and the actual token is sent only via e-mail to the user. This means that:

  • Devise now requires a config.secret_key configuration. As soon as you boot your application under Devise 3.1, you will get an error with information about how to proceed;
  • Every time the user asks a token to be resent, a new token will be generated;
  • The Devise mailer now receives one extra token argument on each method. If you have customized the Devise mailer, you will have to update it. All mailers views also need to be updated to use @token, as shown here, instead of getting the token directly from the resource;
  • Any previously stored token in the database will no longer work unless you set config.allow_insecure_token_lookup = true in your Devise initializer. We recomend users upgrading to set this option on production only for a couple days, allowing users that just requested a token to get their job done.

Thanks to Stephen Touset for reporting this issue and working with us on a solution.

Token Authenticatable

Jay Feldblum also wrote to us to let us know that our tokens lookup are also vulnerable to timing attacks. Although we haven’t heard of any exploit via timing attacks on database tokens, there is a lot of research happening in this area and some attacks have been successful over the local network. For this reason, we have decided to protect applications using Devise from now on.

By digesting the confirmation, reset password and unlock tokens, as described in the previous section, we automatically protected those tokens from timing attacks.

However, we cannot digest the authentication token provided by TokenAuthenticatable, as they are often part of APIs where the token is used many times. Since the usage of the authenticatable token can vary considerably in between applications, each requiring different safety guarantees, we have decided to remove TokenAuthenticatable from Devise, allowing users to pick the best option. This gist describes two of the available solutions.

Thanks to Jay Feldblum for reporting this issue and working with us on a solution.

TL;DR for upgrading

As soon as you update Devise, you will get a warning asking you to set your config.secret_key. By upgrading Devise, your previous confirmation, reset and unlock tokens in the database will no longer work unless you set the following option to true in your Devise initializer:

config.allow_insecure_token_lookup = true

It is recommended to leave this option on just for a couple days, just to allow recently generated tokens by your application to be consumed by users. TokenAuthenticable has not been affected by those changes, however it has been deprecated and you will have to move to your own token authentication mechanisms.

Furthermore, the Devise mailer now receives an extra token argument on each method. If you have customized the Devise mailer, you will have to update it. All mailers views also need to be updated to use @token, as shown here, instead of getting the token directly from the resource.

With those changes, we hope to provide an even more secure authentication solution for Rails developers, while maintaining the flexibility expected from Devise.

One more thing, we’re writing a free ebook about Devise!

If you want to know more about Devise, we’re writing a free ebook about it.
Fill in the form below so that we can send you updates with new chapters and beta releases.


Devise has been reported to be vulnerable to CSRF token fixation attacks.

The attack can only be exploited if the attacker can set the target session, either by subdomain cookies (similar to described here) or by fixation over the same Wi-Fi network. If the user knows the CSRF token, cross-site forgery requests can be made. More information can be found here.

Note Devise is not vulnerable to session fixation attacks (i.e. the user cannot steal another user session by fixating the session id).

Releases

Devise 3.0.1 and 2.2.5 have been released with fixes for the attack.

If you can’t upgrade, you must protect your Devise application by adding the next three lines to a Rails initializer:

Warden::Manager.after_authentication do |record, warden, options|
  warden.request.session.try(:delete, :_csrf_token)
end

Notice the code above and the updated Devise versions will clean up the CSRF Token after any authentication (sign in, sign up, reset password, etc). So if you are using AJAX for such features, you will need to fetch a new CSRF token from the server.

Acknowledgements

We want to thank Egor Homakov for reporting the issue and working with us on a fix.

This week we released the first release candidate version of Devise that is fully compatible with Rails 4, and we’re bumping its version to 3.0. This version completely drops support for Rails 3.1 and Ruby 1.8.7, only keeping compatibility with both Rails 3.2 and Rails 4, running with Ruby 1.9.3 and 2.0.

This rc version took some time to get ready, we’ve been running a rails4 branch for some time already and one of the reasons was because of the changes required to make it compatible with the new strong parameters API from Rails 4. We are aware that some people have been using this branch since Rails 4.0 beta1 with success, and we’re now inviting you to try 3.0 rc with the recent release of Rails 4.0 rc1.

Devise stable

Together with the 3.0 beta version, we’ve released Devise 2.2.4 with a few enhancements and bug fixes, make sure to check the changelog to see the new goodies. All changes are also included in the rc version.

Simple Form

Simple Form has been running a 3.0 rc version for a couple months already, fully compatible with Rails 4 as well, and today we are releasing its release candidate version. In Simple Form master we just dropped support to the 3.x Rails series, focusing our work on Rails 4 compatibility from now on, due to a series of improvements in Rails 4 regarding form helpers – but don’t worry, we will be keeping a v2.1 branch with Rails 3.2 compatibility for a while.

We have some cool plans to improve the wrappers API even further, but that’s subject for another blog post :).

Responders

Responders has been around for quite some time already and we use it in most of our projects, so today we’re celebrating its 1.0 release candidate version, specially to support Rails 4.

Show For

Show For just got a new stable release, v0.2.6, with all the enhancements and bug fixes that were in master, plus a v0.3.0 rc version that adds Rails 4 support.

Mail Form

Mail Form also got a new 1.5 rc release with Rails 4.0 compatibility. Nothing else has changed from the current 1.4 version.

Has Scope

Has Scope is getting a new 0.6 rc version with Rails 4.0 compatibility, including a couple of fixes that were already present in master.

Compatibility

All these new releases are officially dropping support to Rails 3.0 and 3.1, and Ruby 1.8.7. We’ll keep compatibility with Rails 3.2 and 4.0 from now on, all of them on the same branches except for Simple Form which has different branches for each Rails version.

Wrapping up

We’ve got new hot releases for you to try out with Rails 4, please give them a try and let us know if you find any issue or have any feedback.

We’d also like to specially thank everyone involved in helping us getting these projects up and running in Rails 4, without you folks that’d have never been possible.

Enjoy <3

We are very glad to announce the logos for two of our favorite Rails open source projects…

Simple Form:

Simple Form Logo

And Devise:

Devise Logo

We would like to congratulate our designer, Bruna Kochi, who was able to capture the essence of each project in their logos. We will write about their design process soon!

Those projects have been in the Rails community for almost 4 years and it was about time for them to have their own visual identity! We would like to thank all contributors and users who have helped those projects to be more robust, flexible and popular!

Hi everybody.

I’d like to announce that Devise v2.2.3, v2.1.3, v2.0.5 and v1.5.4 have been released with a security patch. Upgrade immediately unless you are using PostgreSQL or SQLite3. Users of all other databases (including NoSQL ones) require immediate upgrade.

Using a specially crafted request, an attacker could trick the database type conversion code to return incorrect records. For some token values this could allow an attacker to bypass the proper checks and gain control of other accounts.

In case you are using a Devise series older than the ones listed above, recommendations are provided below back to v1.2 series. Regardless, an upgrade to more recent versions is advised.

Versions affected

We checked all Devise versions released in the previous two years and recommendations follows as below.

v1.5, v2.0, v2.1 and v2.2 series

You can upgrade to any of v2.2.3, v2.1.3, v2.0.5 and v1.5.4. In case an upgrade is not feasible, please add the following patch to config/initializers/devise_patch.rb inside your Rails application:

Devise::ParamFilter.class_eval do
  def param_requires_string_conversion?(_value); true; end
end

v1.4 series

Please add the following patch to config/initializers/devise_patch.rb inside your Rails application:

Devise::Models::Authenticatable::ClassMethods.class_eval do
  def auth_param_requires_string_conversion?(value); true; end
end

Please upgrade to more recent versions.

v1.2 and v1.3 series

Not affected by this vulnerability. Please upgrade to more recent versions.

Upgrade notice

When upgrading to any of v2.2.3, v2.1.3, v2.0.5 and v1.5.4, some people may be relying on some wrong behaviour to filter data retrieved on authentication. For example, one may have writen in his model:

def find_for_authentication(conditions)
  conditions[:active] = true
  super
end

The code above may no longer work and needs to be rewriten as:

def find_for_authentication(conditions)
  find_first_by_auth_conditions(conditions, active: true)
end

Thank you notes

We would like to thank joernchen of Phenoelit for disclosing this vulnerability and working with us on a patch.