Posts tagged "ruby"

Using the test pyramid to have better feedback from your test suite

In this blog post, I’ll explain the problem of developers spending too much time trying to discover a problem in a failing test suite. A cause of this issue may be the lack of a good test feedback. A good feedback is one that happens fast with a helpful message. To illustrate this problem, consider … »

Highlights of RubyConf Brazil 2016

Last week happened the biggest Ruby-related conference in Latin America, RubyConf Brazil. Our team was present in this edition, which by the way, was particularly interesting, therefore I’d like to share some highlights. The first highlight comes from the night before the event. We went to a bar with some conference speakers. It was really … »

Keeping your Ruby on Rails app easy to update

The Rails 5 release candidate is out, bringing new improvements that will make your life as a developer easier. Probably you are excited to update your application to the new major Rails release, but you may have some concerns. It is normal, updating your application to fit the new version may bring an unknown number … »

Experimenting with explicit contracts with Ruby

A few months back, José Valim started a conversation on overusing mocks and coupling between components. That made me interested on revisiting how I design my code and it has changed my approach to testing a bit in one of our current Ruby projects. A Tale of Two Adapters Back in November, I worked on … »

Nobody told me Minitest was this fun

Ever since I started working with Ruby I have been using RSpec to test my apps and gems without giving minitest much thought. Recently I started a new non-Rails project and decided to give Minitest a try just for the fun of it. Migrating from one tool to another was refreshingly fun due to the … »

Ruby blocks precedence

When we start programming with Ruby, one of the first niceties we learn about are the Ruby blocks. In the beginning it’s easy to get tricked by the two existing forms of blocks and when to use each: %w(a b c).each { |char| puts char } %w(a b c).each do |char| puts char end The … »